ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE : NOSOPHARM AND THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO DESCRIBE MECHANISM OF ACTION OF NEW CLASS OF ANTIBIOTICS IN MOLECULAR CELLANTIBIORESISTANCE : NOSOPHARM ET L'UNIVERSITE DE L'ILLINOIS A CHICAGO DECRIVENT LE MECANISME D'ACTION D'UNE NOUVELLE CLASSE D'ANTIBIOTIQUES DANS MOLECULAR CELL

Newly discovered antibiotic binds to ribosome and disrupts protein synthesis

Lyon, France, and Chicago (IL), United States – April 5 2018 – Nosopharm, a company dedicated to the research and development of new anti-infective drugs, and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) today announce the publication of a study in Molecular Cell on the mechanism of action of odilorhabdins, a new class of antibiotics to combat antibiotic resistance.

The antibiotic, first identified by Nosopharm, is unique and promising on two fronts: its unconventional source and its distinct way of killing bacteria, both of which suggest the compound may be effective at treating drug-resistant or hard to treat bacterial infections.

Called odilorhabdins, or ODLs, the antibiotics are produced by symbiotic bacteria found in soil-dwelling nematode worms that colonize insects for food. The bacteria help to kill the insect and, importantly, secrete the antibiotic to keep competing bacteria away. Until now, these nematode-associated bacteria and the antibiotics they make have been largely understudied.

The odilorhabdin program was launched by Nosopharm in 2011. To identify the antibiotic, Nosopharm’s researchers team screened eighty cultured strains of the bacteria for antimicrobial activity. They then isolated the active compounds, studied their chemical structures and their structure-activity relationships, investigated their pharmacology and engineered more potent derivatives.

The study, published in Molecular Cell[1], describes the new antibiotic and, for the first time, how it works. Nosopharm’s Maxime Gualtieri, UIC’s Alexander Mankin and Yury Polikanov are corresponding authors on the study and led the research on the antibiotic’s mechanism of action. They found that ODLs act on the ribosome – the molecular machine of individual cells that makes the proteins it needs to function – of bacterial cells.

“Novel classes of antibiotics like the odilorhabdins are very difficult to discover, but then very interesting to investigate”, said Maxime Gualtieri, co-founder and chief scientific officer of Nosopharm. “Our research at Nosopharm is focused on the understanding of the pharmacology of this new class, and the elucidation of their mode of action is a part of this work. We accumulated several early evidences that the bacterial translation was the target of the ODLs. At this point, we needed complementary scientific expertise to investigate much more in detail the mechanism of action of the molecules. This was the purpose of our collaboration with the UIC.”

“Like many clinically-useful antibiotics, ODLs work by targeting the ribosome,” said Yury Polikanov, assistant professor of biological sciences in the UIC College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, “But ODLs are unique because they bind to a place on the ribosome that has never been used by other known antibiotics.”

“When ODLs are introduced to the bacterial cells, they impact the reading ability of the ribosome and cause the ribosome to make mistakes when it creates new proteins,” said Alexander Mankin, director of the Center for Biomolecular Sciences in the UIC College of Pharmacy. “This miscoding corrupts the cell with flawed proteins and causes the bacterial cell to die.”

While many antibiotics can slow bacterial growth, Mankin says antibiotics that actually kill bacteria, called bactericidal antibiotics, are rare.

“The bactericidal mechanism of ODLs and the fact that they bind to a site on the ribosome not exploited by any known antibiotic are very strong indicators that ODLs have the potential to treat infections that are unresponsive to other antibiotics,” said Mankin, who is also professor of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy in the UIC College of Pharmacy.

According to the World Health Organization[2], antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health today and a significant contributor to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs and increased mortality.

In France, the Nosopharm researchers tested the ODL compounds against bacterial pathogens, including many known to develop resistance.

“We found that the ODL compounds cured mice infected with several pathogenic bacteria and demonstrated activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, notably including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,” said co-corresponding author Maxime Gualtieri, co-founder and chief scientific officer of Nosopharm.

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, are a family of germs that have high levels of resistance to antibiotics. One study[3] suggests that CRE, which are the common culprits in bloodstream and surgical site infections, contribute to death in up to 50 percent of patients who become infected.

The researchers say this study is a testament to the growing trend of international and cross-disciplinary collaboration, which is needed to combat the growing and global threat of antibiotic resistance.

“As a biotech company, Nosopharm has to focus on the pharmaceutical development of the ODLs,” said Philippe Villain-Guillot, co-founder and chief executive officer of Nosopharm. “Collaborations with academia with renown expertise in antibiotics like the UIC team help us for this preclinical development and add credibility to the research”.

NOSO-502, the first clinical candidate of the odilhorhabdins, is the most advanced molecule in Nosopharm’s portfolio. The company plans to begin the first clinical trials in humans in 2020.

Collaborating on the research, which was funded by Nosopharm, are Lucile Pantel, Emilie Racine, Matthieu Sarciaux, Marine Serri, Jessica Houard and Andre Aumelas from Nosopharm; Tanja Florin and Malgorzata Dobosz-Bartoszek from the University of Illinois at Chicago; Jean-Marc Campagne, Renata Marcia de Figueiredo and Camille Midrier from the Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier in Montpellier, France; Sophie Gaudriault, Alain Givaudan and Anne Lanois from the Universite de Montpellier in Montpellier, France; Steve Forst from the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Christelle Cotteaux-Lautard and Jean-Michel Bolla from Aix-Marseille Universite in Marseille, France; Carina Vingsbo Lundberg from Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark; and Douglas Huseby and Diarmaid Hughes from Uppsala University in Uppsala, Sweden.

About Nosopharm

Nosopharm is a biotechnology company specialized in the research and development of new antimicrobial molecules. Nosopharm discovered and developed NOSO-502, a first-in-class antibiotic for the treatment of multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired infections. It has developed a unique expertise in the discovery of natural bioactive products stemming from the Xenorhadbus and Photorhabdus microbial genera and in the medicinal chemistry of Odilorhabdins, the new class of antibiotics to which NOSO-502 belongs. Founded in 2009, Nosopharm is based in Lyon, France, and has a staff of eight. To date, the company has raised a total of €4.3M ($5.2M) in private equity and received €3.8M ($4.6M) in grants from Bpifrance, IMI, DGA, Region Languedoc-Roussillon and FEDER.

www.nosopharm.com

[1] http://www.cell.com/molecular-cell/abstract/S1097-2765(18)30182-5

[2] http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/antibiotic-resistance/en/

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/cre-patients.html

Le nouvel antibiotique décrit s’attache au ribosome et perturbe la synthèse des protéines

Lyon, France, et Chicago, Etats-Unis – le 5 avril 2018 – Nosopharm, entreprise innovante dédiée à la recherche et au développement de nouveaux médicaments anti-infectieux, et l’Université de l’Illinois à Chicago (UIC), annoncent aujourd’hui la publication d’une étude scientifique dans Molecular Cell sur le mécanisme d’action des Odilorhabdines, une nouvelle classe d’antibiotiques qui vise à lutter contre l’antibiorésistance.

Cet antibiotique, identifié à l’origine par Nosopharm, est unique et prometteur pour deux raisons : sa source, qui n’est pas conventionnelle, et sa façon spécifique de tuer les bactéries. Ces deux éléments suggèrent que le composé peut être efficace pour le traitement des infections bactériennes résistantes aux médicaments ou difficiles à soigner.

Dénommés Odilorhabdines ou ODL, ces antibiotiques sont produits par une bactérie symbiotique que l’on retrouve dans les nématodes, des petits vers qui colonisent les insectes pour se nourrir. La bactérie aide à tuer l’insecte et secrète alors un antibiotique pour éloigner les bactéries concurrentes. Jusqu’à maintenant, on avait très peu étudié ces bactéries associées à des nématodes ou les antibiotiques qu’elles produisent.

Nosopharm a lancé le programme Odilorhabdines en 2011. Pour identifier l’antibiotique, les chercheurs de Nosopharm ont passé en revue 80 souches de la bactérie en recherchant une activité microbienne. Ils ont ensuite isolé les composés actifs, étudié leur structure chimique et la relation entre structure et activité, ainsi que leur pharmacologie, avant de concevoir des dérivés plus puissants.

L’étude scientifique publiée dans Molecular Cell[1] décrit le nouvel antibiotique et, pour la première fois, son fonctionnement. Les auteurs principaux de l’étude sont Maxime Gualtieri de Nosopharm, et Alexander Mankin et Yury Polikanov de l’UIC. Ils ont effectué des recherches sur le mécanisme d’action de l’antibiotique et ont démontré que l’ODL agit sur le ribosome des cellules bactériennes. Le ribosome est la machinerie moléculaire des cellules, et synthétise les protéines nécessaires à leur fonctionnement.

« Les nouvelles classes d’antibiotiques comme les Odilorhabdines sont très difficiles à découvrir, mais très intéressantes à étudier, » indique Maxime Gualtieri, co-fondateur et directeur scientifique de Nosopharm. « Nos recherches sont concentrées sur la compréhension de la pharmacologie de cette nouvelle classe, et notamment sur l’explication de leur mode d’action. Nous avions déjà obtenu plusieurs résultats expérimentaux indiquant que la traduction bactérienne est la cible des ODL. A ce stade, nous avons fait appel à une expertise scientifique complémentaire pour étudier plus en détails le mécanisme d’action des molécules. C’est pour cela que nous avons mis en place une collaboration avec l’UIC. »

« A l’instar de nombreux antibiotiques utiles en clinique, les ODL fonctionnent en ciblant le ribosome », ajoute Yuri Polikanov, professeur assistant de sciences biologiques à l’UIC College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. « Mais les ODL sont uniques car elles se lient à un endroit du ribosome qui n’est pas utilisé par les antibiotiques connus. »

« Quand les ODL sont introduites dans les cellules bactériennes, elles affectent la capacité de lecture du ribosome et l’induisent en erreur au moment de la synthèse de nouvelles protéines », ajoute Alexander Mankin, directeur du Center for Biomolecular Sciences à l’UIC College of Pharmacy. « Ce codage erroné corrompt la cellule bactérienne avec des protéines défectueuses et entraine sa mort. »

De nombreux antibiotiques sont capables de ralentir la croissance bactérienne, mais les antibiotiques qui tuent réellement les bactéries, appelés antibiotiques bactéricides, sont rares, selon Alexander Mankin.

« Le mécanisme bactéricide des ODLs et le fait qu’elles se lient à un site du ribosome qui n’est exploité par aucun antibiotique connu, prouvent de façon claire que les ODL ont le potentiel de traiter les infections qui ne répondent pas aux autres antibiotiques », précise Alexander Mankin, qui est également professeur de chimie médicinale et de pharmacognosie au College of Pharmacy de l’UIC.

Selon l’Organisation Mondiale de la Santé[2], l’antibiorésistance est l’une des plus grandes menaces actuelles pour la santé dans le monde. Elle contribue de manière significative à augmenter la durée des séjours à l’hôpital, ainsi que les dépenses de santé et la mortalité.

En France, les chercheurs de Nosopharm ont testé les composés ODL contre des pathogènes bactériens, dont plusieurs connus pour leur capacité à développer une résistance.

« Nous avons découvert que les composés ODL guérissaient des souris infectées par plusieurs bactéries pathogènes et qu’ils montraient une activité contre les pathogènes à Gram négatif et à Gram positif, notamment contre les entérobactéries résistantes aux carbapénèmes », souligne Maxime Gualtieri, co-auteur de l’étude et directeur scientifique chez Nosopharm.

Les entérobactéries résistantes aux carbapénèmes, ou ERC, sont une famille de germes qui présentent des niveaux de résistance aux antibiotiques très élevés. Une étude[3] suggère que les ERC, que l’on retrouve principalement dans des infections sanguines et des infections du site opératoire, contribuent au décès de près de 50% des patients infectés.

Selon les chercheurs, cette étude scientifique est un bel exemple de la collaboration croissante entre disciplines scientifiques et pays, qui est nécessaire pour combattre la menace croissante de la résistance aux antibiotiques dans le monde.

« En tant que société de biotechnologies, Nosopharm doit se concentrer sur le développement pharmaceutique des ODL », précise Philippe Villain-Guillot, Président du directoire de Nosopharm. « Les collaborations avec des universitaires ayant une expertise reconnue dans le domaine des antibiotiques comme l’équipe de l’UIC sont bénéfiques pour notre développement préclinique et viennent renforcer la crédibilité de nos recherches. »

NOSO-502, le premier candidat clinique des Odilorhabdines, est la molécule la plus avancée du portefeuille de Nosopharm. La société prévoit de démarrer les premiers essais cliniques chez l’homme en 2020.

Les personnes suivantes ont participé à la recherche financée par Nosopharm: Lucile Pantel, Emilie Racine, Matthieu Sarciaux, Marine Serri, Jessica Houard et André Aumelas de Nosopharm, Tanja Florin et Malgorzata Dobosz-Bartoszek de l’Université de l’Illinois à Chicago ; Jean-Marc Campagne, Renata Marcia de Figueiredo et Camille Midrier de l’Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier ; Sophie Gaudriault, Alain Givaudan et Anne Lanois de l’Université de Montpellier ; Steve Forst de l’Université du Wisconsin à Milwaukee, Christelle Cotteaux-Lautard et Jean-Michel Bolla de l’Université Aix-Marseille ; Carina Vingsbo Lundberg du Statens Serum Institut à Copenhague, au Danemark et Douglas Huseby et Diarmaid Hughes de l’Université d’Uppsala, en Suède.

A propos de Nosopharm

Nosopharm est une société de biotechnologies spécialisée dans la recherche et le développement de nouvelles molécules anti-infectieuses. La société a découvert et développé NOSO-502, un antibiotique de nouvelle génération dans le traitement des infections aux pathogènes hospitaliers multi-résistants. Nosopharm a développé une expertise unique dans la découverte de produits naturels bioactifs issus des genres microbiens Xenorhadbus et Photorhabdus, et en chimie médicale des odilorhabdines, la nouvelle classe d’antibiotiques à laquelle appartient NOSO-502.

Fondée en 2009, Nosopharm est basée à Lyon (France) et s’appuie sur une équipe de huit personnes. A ce jour, la société a levé 4,3M€ en capital privé et a reçu 3,8M€ d’aides publiques de Bpifrance, l’IMI, la DGA, la région Languedoc-Roussillon et FEDER.

www.nosopharm.com

[1] http://www.cell.com/molecular-cell/abstract/S1097-2765(18)30182-5

[2] http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/antibiotic-resistance/fr/

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/cre-patients.html

 

ByPar Philippe Villain-Guillot 06/04/2018 Categories: Les catégories: News

 

Contact UsContactez nous
Close

Phone
+33 (0) 411 716 185

Nosopharm Headquarters
Danica B
21 avenue Georges Pompidou
69486 Lyon cedex 03
France


Nosopharm Labs

Espace Innovation 2
110 allée Charles Babbage
Parc Scientifique G. Besse
30000 Nîmes
France

Tél
+33 (0) 411 716 185

Siège social
Danica B
21 avenue Georges Pompidou
69486 Lyon cedex 03
France

Nosopharm Labs

Espace Innovation 2
110 allée Charles Babbage
Parc Scientifique G. Besse
30000 Nîmes
France