Nosopharm renews its partnership with InraNosopharm renouvelle son partenariat avec l’Inra

This second screening campaign aims to discover new classes of antimicrobial agents for treating multi-resistant infections

Lyon, France, May 30, 2018 – Nosopharm, a company dedicated to the research and development of new anti-infective drugs, today announces that it has renewed its partnership with the French National Institute of Agricultural Research (Inra). This partnership with Inra’s Diversity, Genomes and Insects-Microorganisms Interactions laboratory (DGIMI) aims to develop new classes of antimicrobial agents for treating multi-drug resistant hospital-acquired infections. These new classes of antimicrobials will then be the subject of patent applications and scientific publications.
Under the terms of the partnership, Inra grants Nosopharm exclusive access to around 100 unique strains of Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus. The DGIMI laboratory has the most extensive collection in the world of strains for these two genera of bacteria. When applying its innovative, proprietary methods to the strains in order to discover new bioactive compounds, Nosopharm will capitalize on experience gathered during the first screening campaign.
The aim of this campaign is to discover a new and innovative systemic antimicrobial agent targeting gram-negative pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as a new systemic novel antifungal agent targeting Candida spp pathogens.
Led by Nosopharm, the first screening campaign on a collection of unique strains of the bacterial genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus belonging to Inra’s DGIMI laboratory, resulted in:
·       Three patent applications covering three new classes of antimicrobials (EP2468718, WO2012085177, WO2016046409)
·       Three articles published in peer-reviewed journals (Molecular Cell, 2018, Genome Announcements, 2014, The Journal of Antibiotics, 2013)
·       An oral presentation at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)
·       The discovery of a new class of antibiotics – odilorhabdins – now at the preclinical stage for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections. This new class has been selected to be part of the European ND4BB ENABLE consortium.
“We are delighted to be working with Inra again to discover new classes of antimicrobial agents. The exclusivity we have been granted gives us a major competitive advantage,” said Philippe Villain-Guillot, CEO of Nosopharm. “With this second screening campaign, we are aiming to discover a new antibacterial molecule against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as a novel antifungal agent. In the longer term, the microbial agents discovered during this partnership could be co-developed with biotechnology firms or pharmaceutical laboratories.”
“Bacteria of the genera Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus are insect pathogens and nematode symbionts; today they are also recognized for their marked ability to produce many bioactive molecules with antimicrobial activity (antibacterial and antifungal). Since the 1980s, our laboratory (DGIMI-UMR Inra-UM1333) has nurtured a collection of these bacteria, which now comprise 650 strains, originating over the five continents. Since 2016, this collection has been associated with the ‘environment’ pillar of the center RARe – Agronomic Resources for Research,” said Alain Givaudan, deputy director of Inra’s DGIMI unit. “With Nosopharm, we are prioritizing research into small molecules of natural origin. The molecules are biosynthesized within the bacteria thanks to large enzyme complexes (called ‘nonribosomal peptide synthetases’ or ‘NRPS’), which are true biological microfactories with unusually long genes by design and are prominent in the Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus genomes.”
Multi-antibiotic resistant hospital pathogens are the cause of at least 380,000 infections and directly responsible for 25,000 deaths each year in Europe. The associated annual treatment and social costs are estimated at €1.5 billion ($1.75bn). At the global level, antibiotic resistance could kill 10 million people worldwide each year between now and 2050, at a total cost of €94 trillion ($110tn). In February 2017, the WHO published a list of bacteria ‘priority pathogens’ for the development of new antibiotics. The pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa sits at the top of this list, with a critical priority level. P. aeruginosa is a factor in 10% of hospital-acquired infections in the European Union and the United States, with a high incidence in cases of pneumonia. In 2016, in Europe, the rate of combined resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics from among piperacillin ± tazobactam, ceftazidime, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides and carbapenems) in P. aeruginosa was 10%. The rate of resistance to carbapenems – antibiotics of last resort – was 15%. The main hospital fungal pathogens are the Candida species, which are a factor in around 6% of hospital-acquired infections in the European Union and the United States. Very few antifungal drug classes exist for treating these infections: azoles, echinocandins, polyenes and flucytosine. Even more concerning is the fact that multi-resistant species of Candida, such as Candida glabrata and Candida auris, are rapidly emerging.
About Inra
Inra is Europe’s top agricultural research institute with 8,042 permanent researchers, engineers and technicians. It is the world’s number two center for the agricultural sciences. Inra contributes to the creation of knowledge and innovation in food, agriculture, and the environment. The institute deploys its research strategy by mobilizing its 13 scientific departments and drawing from a unique network in Europe that boasts over 184 research units and 45 experimental units located across 17 regional centers. Its global ambition is to contribute to ensuring healthy and high-quality food, competitive and sustainable agriculture, and a protected and valued environment.
http://institut.inra.fr/en
About Nosopharm
Nosopharm is a biotechnology company specialized in the research and development of new antimicrobial molecules. Nosopharm discovered and developed NOSO-502, a first-in-class antibiotic for the treatment of multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired infections. It has developed a unique expertise in the discovery of natural bioactive products stemming from the Xenorhadbus and Photorhabdus microbial genera and in the medicinal chemistry of Odilorhabdins, the new class of antibiotics to which NOSO-502 belongs. Founded in 2009, Nosopharm is based in Lyon, France, and has a staff of eight. To date, the company has raised a total of €4.3M ($5.2M) in private equity and received €3.8M ($4.6M) in grants from Bpifrance, IMI, DGA, Region Languedoc-Roussillon and FEDER.
www.nosopharm.com

Cette deuxième campagne de criblage vise à découvrir de nouvelles classes d’agents antimicrobiens pour le traitement des infections multi-résistantes

Lyon, France, le 30 mai 2018 – Nosopharm, entreprise innovante dédiée à la recherche et au développement de nouveaux médicaments anti-infectieux, annonce aujourd’hui le renouvellement de son partenariat avec l’Inra – l’Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique. Ce partenariat avec le laboratoire Diversité, Génomes & Interactions Microorganismes-Insectes (DGIMI) vise à développer de nouvelles classes d’agents antimicrobiens pour le traitement des infections nosocomiales pharmaco-résistantes. Les nouvelles classes d’agents microbiens qui seront découvertes feront par la suite l’objet de demandes de brevets et de publications scientifiques.
Selon les termes du partenariat, l’Inra donne à Nosopharm un accès exclusif à environ 100 souches uniques de Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus. La collection de souches du laboratoire DGIMI est la plus importante et la plus variée au monde pour ces deux genres bactériens. Nosopharm tirera profit de l’expérience accumulée lors de la première campagne de criblage pour appliquer ses méthodes innovantes propriétaires aux souches afin de découvrir de nouveaux composés bioactifs.
L’objectif de cette campagne est de découvrir un nouvel agent antimicrobien systémique innovant ciblant les pathogènes à Gram négatif, y compris Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ainsi qu’un nouvel antifongique systémique novateur ciblant les pathogènes Candida spp.
La première campagne de criblage menée par Nosopharm sur une collection de souches uniques des genres bactériens Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus appartenant au laboratoire DGIMI de l’Inra avait permis de :
·       déposer trois demandes de brevets couvrant trois nouvelles classes d’antimicrobiens (EP2468718, WO2012085177, WO2016046409),
·       publier trois articles dans des revues à comité de lecture (Mol. Cell, 2018, Genome Announc., 2014, J. Antibiot, 2013),
·       faire une présentation orale lors de la 54e Conférence Interscience sur les Agents Antimicrobiens et la Chimiothérapie (ICAAC),
·       découvrir les Odilorhabdines, une nouvelle classe antibiotique actuellement au stade préclinique pour le traitement des infections aux Enterobacteriaceae multirésistantes. Cette nouvelle classe a été sélectionnée pour rejoindre le consortium européen ND4BB ENABLE.
« Nous nous réjouissons de collaborer à nouveau avec l’Inra pour découvrir de nouvelles classes d’agents antimicrobiens. L’exclusivité qui nous est accordée nous confère un avantage concurrentiel majeur », déclare Philippe Villain-Guillot, président du directoire de Nosopharm. « Avec cette deuxième campagne de criblage, nous visons la découverte d’une nouvelle molécule antibactérienne contre Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ainsi qu’un nouvel antifongique novateur. A plus long terme, les agents microbiens découverts dans le cadre de cette collaboration pourraient être co-développés avec des sociétés de biotechnologies ou des laboratoires pharmaceutiques. »
« Les bactéries des genres Xenorhabdus et Photorhabdus sont à la fois pathogènes d’insectes et symbiotes de nématodes mais aujourd’hui elles sont aussi reconnues pour leur grande capacité à produire de nombreuses molécules bioactives à activité antimicrobienne (antibactérienne et antifongique). Notre Laboratoire (DGIMI-UMR INRA-UM1333) a entretenu depuis les années 80 une collection de ces bactéries qui regroupe actuellement 650 souches et dont l’origine couvre les cing continents. Depuis 2016, cette collection est associée au pilier « environnement » du centre de Ressources Agronomiques pour la Recherche », déclare Alain Givaudan, directeur adjoint de l’unité DGIMI de l’Inra. « Avec Nosopharm, nous privilégions la recherche de petites molécules d’origine naturelle. Leur biosynthèse est réalisée chez la bactérie grâce à de larges complexes enzymatiques (appelés « non ribosomal peptide synthetase » ou NRPS) qui sont de véritables micro-usines biologiques codées par des gènes d’une longueur inhabituelle et très représentés dans les génomes de Xenorhabdus et Photorhabdus. »
Chaque année en Europe, les pathogènes hospitaliers multi-résistants aux antibiotiques sont responsables d’au moins 380 000 infections et de 25 000 décès directs. Le traitement annuel et les coûts sociaux sont estimés à 1,5 milliard d’euros. Au niveau mondial, la résistance aux antibiotiques pourrait tuer 10 millions de personnes dans le monde chaque année d’ici à 2050, pour un coût total de 94 trillions d’euros. En février 2017, l’OMS a publié une liste de bactéries pathogènes prioritaires pour le développement de nouveaux antibiotiques. Le pathogène Pseudomonas aeruginosa occupe le haut de cette liste, avec un niveau de priorité critique. P. aeruginosa est impliqué dans environ 10% des infections nosocomiales dans l’Union Européenne et aux États-Unis, avec une forte incidence dans les cas de pneumonies. En 2016, les taux de résistance combinée (résistance à trois ou plus classes antibiotiques parmi la piperacilline ± tazobactam, la ceftazidime, les fluoroquinolones, les aminoglycosides et les carbapénèmes) chez P. aeruginosa était de 10% en Europe. Le taux de résistance aux carbapénèmes, les antibiotiques de dernier recours, était de 15%. Les principaux champignons pathogènes hospitaliers sont les espèces des Candida qui sont impliquées dans environ 6% des infections nosocomiales dans l’Union Européenne et aux États-Unis. Il existe très peu de classes de médicaments antifongiques pour traiter ces infections : les azoles, les échinocandines, les polyènes et la flucytosine. Ceci est d’autant plus préoccupant que des espèces de Candida multi-résistantes émergent rapidement comme Candida glabrata et Candida auris.
A propos de l’Inra
Premier institut de recherche agronomique en Europe avec 8 042 chercheurs, ingénieurs et techniciens permanents, au 2e rang mondial pour ses publications en sciences agronomiques, l’Inra contribue à la production de connaissances et à l’innovation dans l’alimentation, l’agriculture et l’environnement.
L’Institut déploie sa stratégie de recherche en mobilisant ses 13 départements scientifiques et en s’appuyant sur un réseau unique en Europe, fort de plus de 184 unités de recherche et de 45 unités expérimentales implantées dans 17 centres en région. L’ambition est, dans une perspective mondiale, de contribuer à assurer une alimentation saine et de qualité, une agriculture compétitive et durable ainsi qu’un environnement préservé et valorisé.
www.inra.fr
A propos de Nosopharm
Nosopharm est une société de biotechnologies spécialisée dans la recherche et le développement de nouvelles molécules anti-infectieuses. La société a découvert et développé NOSO-502, un antibiotique de nouvelle génération dans le traitement des infections aux pathogènes hospitaliers multi-résistants. Nosopharm a développé une expertise unique dans la découverte de produits naturels bioactifs issus des genres microbiens Xenorhadbus et Photorhabdus, et en chimie médicale des Odilorhabdines, la nouvelle classe d’antibiotiques à laquelle appartient NOSO-502.
Fondée en 2009, Nosopharm est basée à Lyon (France) et s’appuie sur une équipe de huit personnes. A ce jour, la société a levé 4,3M€ en capital privé et a reçu 3,8M€ d’aides publiques de Bpifrance, l’IMI, la DGA, la région Languedoc-Roussillon et FEDER.
www.nosopharm.com
ByPar Philippe Villain-Guillot 30/05/2018 Categories: Les catégories: News

 

Contact UsContactez nous
Close

Phone
+33 (0) 411 716 185

Nosopharm Headquarters
Danica B
21 avenue Georges Pompidou
69486 Lyon cedex 03
France


Nosopharm Labs

Espace Innovation 2
110 allée Charles Babbage
Parc Scientifique G. Besse
30000 Nîmes
France

Tél
+33 (0) 411 716 185

Siège social
Danica B
21 avenue Georges Pompidou
69486 Lyon cedex 03
France

Nosopharm Labs

Espace Innovation 2
110 allée Charles Babbage
Parc Scientifique G. Besse
30000 Nîmes
France