Nosopharm signs partnership with INRAE and University of Montpellier to develop new anti-infectivesNosopharm signe un partenariat avec INRAE et l’Université de Montpellier pour développer de nouveaux anti-infectieux

Collaboration aims to produce chemical libraries of bioactive molecules that will feed into Nosopharm’s anti-infective screening procedures

Nosopharm and its partner, the DGIMI laboratory (UMR INRAE—University of Montpellier), hope to establish joint laboratory in 2023

Lyon, France, March 15, 2022—Nosopharm, specialized in exploring unconventional sources of antibiotics to discover new drugs to fight antimicrobial resistance, today announces that it has signed a collaboration agreement with the DGIMI laboratory (UMR1333: Diversity, Genomes and Insects-Microorganisms Interactions). DGIMI falls under the authority of the French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (INRAE) and the University of Montpellier. The aim of this collaboration is to produce chemical libraries of new bioactive molecules which will feed into Nosopharm’s anti-infective screening campaigns against antibiotic resistance. ‘France Relance’, the French government investment plan created following the Covid-19 pandemic, brings financial support to this new collaboration between Nosopharm, INRAE and University of Montpellier.

Nosopharm and the DGIMI laboratory set up a research strategy with a view to cataloguing the entire range of specialized bioactive metabolites produced by the bacteria strains Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus, as well as by strains frequently associated with them (microbiota of entomopathogenic nematodes), regardless of their biological activity. Those metabolites will be grouped into libraries that are compatible with biological activity screenings used to identify their potential applications for human, animal and plant health.

The production of specialized bioactive microbial metabolites is linked to the presence of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters (BGCs) in the genomes of microorganisms. Although many BGCs have been identified in certain strains of bacteria, little is known about the chemical structures and biological activity of the metabolites associated with them, in particular in Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus. Often the primary obstacle to fully exploiting the potential of Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus is an inability to identify all of the three elements (BGC, chemical structure and bioactivity).

“We are delighted to be collaborating with the DGIMI laboratory and its teams. This partnership will allow us to bolster our unique expertise in the pharmacological exploitation of the bacteria strains Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus, which are used exclusively by Nosopharm. Our objective is to discover innovative anti-infective molecules with new modes of action in order to offer solutions in the ongoing fight against antibiotic resistance,” said Philippe Villain-Guillot, co-founder and CEO of Nosopharm.

“As a result of this collaboration, we will be able to fully exploit our original collection of microorganisms in order to facilitate the discovery of new anti-infective molecules, all against the backdrop of a global rise in antibiotic-resistance-related deaths. We will also be able to conduct some fundamental research into the role of these molecules in our tripartite interaction model, consisting of bacteria, nematodes and insects,” said Alain Givaudan, director of research at the DGIMI laboratory.

“The discovery of new molecules and their biological activity is crucial to understanding the interactions, both between microorganisms and between microorganisms and their hosts. This topic is a core component of our curriculum here at the University of Montpellier; this collaboration with Nosopharm will enable constructive interactions between the biotech industry and our pool of students. The exploitation of new natural molecule resources found in our environment seems likely to reveal its true potential in connection with the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, which will be a challenge for future generations,” added Alyssa Carré-Mlouka, senior lecturer at the University of Montpellier and associate of the DGIMI laboratory.

This collaboration brings together the DGIMI laboratory’s expertise in the molecular genomics and genetics of the bacteria strains Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus and Nosopharm’s expertise in the production of specialized bioactive metabolites from the same strains. The partners initially plan to obtain proof of concept that the project is technically sound in genetic engineering terms. Then, they intend to optimize the yields of the new procedures. Finally, within the next 12 to 18 months they hope to set up a shared laboratory devoted to the chemical ecology of Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus.

These new chemical libraries may also be made available to companies and third-party research institutes in connection with screening campaigns for new molecules of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest. Small molecules actually play a huge role in the quest for therapeutic innovations. Of the 63 therapeutic products approved by the FDA in 2021, 36 were small molecules, which equates to 57%. As a result, biopharmaceutical laboratories are desperately trying to discover innovative small bioactive molecules to add to their portfolio of products under development.

The collaboration between Nosopharm and INRAE began as soon as the company was founded in 2009. It has resulted in the discovery of three new antimicrobial classes, for which three patent requests were filed. The patent for the Odilorhabdins class was granted in Europe, the United States, Japan and China. The collaboration has also resulted in five articles being published in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

The growing resistance of pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics poses a threat to global public health. According to an analysis published in The Lancet in January 2022, 4.95 million people worldwide died of diseases linked to antibiotic resistance in 2019; 1.27 million of these were a direct result of antimicrobial resistance. The infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are among the primary causes of death in all age categories, ahead of AIDS and malaria.

Nosopharm is developing a new class of antibiotics, Odilorhabdins, which inhibit the bacterial ribosome via a new mechanism of action. NOSO-502, the first clinical candidate in this new class, is intended for the treatment of nosocomial infections caused by Enterobacteriales, including those that are resistant to polymyxins and carbapenems (CRE). In 2017, the WHO identified CREs as a critical research and development priority.

 

About the Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus bacteria

Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus are bacteria that live symbiotically with entomopathogenic nematodes. The genomes of these bacteria contain a huge amount of BGCs, which means they are capable of producing a very wide range of small bioactive molecules, called specialized metabolites. These small molecules allow the bacteria to interact with their hosts, the members of the nematode’s microbiota and their microbial competitors. The study of this chemical diversity and its role in interactions among microorganisms and between microorganisms and their environment is known as chemical ecology. The specific biological activities of these molecules can be exploited for use in human, animal and plant health. Although many of the BGCs of Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus are known, there is still much to learn about the chemical structures of the molecules associated with them, as well as their biological activity.

To download the news release: News release Nosopharm INRAE 2022

Cette collaboration a pour objectif de produire des chimiothèques de molécules bioactives qui alimenteront les criblages anti-infectieux de Nosopharm

Nosopharm et son partenaire, le laboratoire DGIMI (UMR INRAE-Université de Montpellier), ont pour objectif de monter un laboratoire commun en 2023

Lyon, France, le 15 mars 2022 – Nosopharm, entreprise innovante dédiée à la recherche et au développement de nouveaux médicaments anti-infectieux, annonce aujourd’hui avoir signé un accord de collaboration avec le laboratoire DGIMI (UMR1333 : Diversité, Génomes & Interactions Microorganismes Insectes), entité sous la tutelle d’INRAE et de l’Université de Montpellier. Cette collaboration vise à produire des chimiothèques de nouvelles molécules bioactives qui alimenteront les criblages anti-infectieux de Nosopharm pour lutter contre la résistance aux antibiotiques. Cette nouvelle collaboration entre Nosopharm, l’INRAE et l’Université de Montpellier est soutenue financièrement par le plan France Relance.

La stratégie de recherche conçue par Nosopharm et le laboratoire DGIMI a pour but d’accéder à l’ensemble des métabolites spécialisés bioactifs produits par les genres bactériens Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus, ainsi que les genres bactériens qui leur sont fréquemment associés (microbiote des nématodes entomopathogènes), indépendamment de leur activité biologique. Ils seront regroupés en bibliothèques compatibles avec des criblages en activité biologique pour identifier des applications potentielles en santé humaine, animale et végétale.

La production de métabolites spécialisés microbiens bioactifs est associée à la présence de Clusters de Gènes de Biosynthèse (CGB) dans les génomes des micro-organismes. Alors que de très nombreux CGB ont été identifiés chez certaines espèces bactériennes, les structures chimiques et les activités biologiques des métabolites associés à ces CGB restent bien souvent inconnus, en particulier chez Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus. L’identification complète du tryptique CGB – structure chimique – bioactivité est souvent l’obstacle principal à la pleine exploitation du potentiel de Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus.

« Nous sommes ravis de collaborer avec le laboratoire DGIMI et ses équipes. Grâce à ce partenariat, nous allons pouvoir renforcer notre expertise unique dans l’exploitation pharmacologique des genres bactériens Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus, des bactéries exploitées uniquement par Nosopharm. Notre objectif est de découvrir de nouvelles molécules anti-infectieuses innovantes avec de nouveaux modes d’action afin de continuer à trouver des solutions dans la lutte permanente contre la résistance aux antibiotiques », explique Philippe Villain-Guillot, co-fondateur et président du directoire de Nosopharm.

« Grâce à cette collaboration, nous pouvons pleinement valoriser notre collection originale de micro-organismes pour faciliter la découverte de nouvelles molécules anti-infectieuses, dans un contexte mondial d’augmentation des décès liées à la résistance aux antibiotiques, mais aussi étudier en recherche fondamentale le rôle de ces molécules dans notre modèle d’interaction tripartite, bactéries, nématodes et insectes », ajoute Alain Givaudan, directeur de recherche au sein du laboratoire DGIMI.

« La découverte de nouvelles molécules et de leurs activités biologiques est fondamentale dans la compréhension des interactions des micro-organismes entre eux et avec leurs hôtes. Cette thématique est au cœur de nos enseignements à l’Université de Montpellier, et la collaboration avec Nosopharm permettra des interactions fructueuses entre l’industrie des biotechnologies et le vivier de nos étudiants. L’exploitation des ressources en nouvelles molécules naturelles issues de notre environnement se propose de dévoiler son potentiel face au problème croissant de l’antibiorésistance, un défi pour les générations futures », indique Alyssa Carré-Mlouka, Maitre de Conférences à l’Université de Montpellier, rattachée au laboratoire DGIMI.

Cette collaboration associe l’expertise du laboratoire DGIMI en génomique et en génétique moléculaire des bactéries des genres Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus à l’expertise de Nosopharm en production de métabolites spécialisés bioactifs de ces mêmes genres. Les partenaires prévoient d’obtenir tout d’abord une preuve de concept de faisabilité technologique en ingénierie génétique. Ils envisagent ensuite d’optimiser les rendements des nouveaux procédés et enfin de mettre en place dans les 12 à 18 mois à venir un laboratoire commun dédié à l’écologie chimique de Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus.

Ces nouvelles chimiothèques pourront également être mise à disposition de sociétés et organismes de recherche tiers pour des campagnes de criblage de nouvelles molécules d’intérêt pharmaceutique et biotechnologique. En effet, les petites molécules constituent une part importante de l’innovation thérapeutique. Sur les 63 produits thérapeutiques approuvés par la FDA en 2021, 36 étaient des petites molécules, soit 57% (source : FDA). Les laboratoires biopharmaceutiques ont donc des besoins importants en découverte de nouvelles petites molécules bioactives innovantes pour alimenter leurs portefeuilles de produits en développement.

La collaboration entre Nosopharm et INRAE a démarré dès la création de l’entreprise en 2009. Elle a donné lieu à la découverte de trois nouvelles familles antimicrobiennes qui ont fait l’objet du dépôt de trois demandes de brevet. Le brevet portant sur la famille des Odilorhabdines a été délivré en Europe, aux Etats-Unis, au Japon et en Chine. La collaboration a également produit cinq articles publiés dans des journaux scientifiques à comité de lecture.

La résistance croissante des bactéries pathogènes aux antibiotiques est une menace pour la santé publique globale. Une analyse publiée dans le journal The Lancet en janvier 2022 estime à 4,95 millions le nombre de personnes décédées de maladies liées à la résistance aux antibiotiques dans le monde en 2019, dont 1,27 million de décès qui étaient le résultat direct de résistances antimicrobiennes. Les infections causées par les bactéries résistantes aux antibiotiques font partie des causes principales de décès tous âges confondus, devant le SIDA et le paludisme.

Nosopharm développe une nouvelle classe d’antibiotiques, les Odilhorhabdines, qui inhibent le ribosome bactérien avec un nouveau mécanisme d’action. NOSO-502, le premier candidat clinique de cette nouvelle famille, est destiné à traiter les infections nosocomiales causées par les Enterobacteriaceae, y compris les Enterobacteriaceae résistantes aux polymyxines et aux carbapénèmes (CRE). Les CRE ont été classées comme une cible de recherche et développement avec une priorité critique par l’OMS en 2017.

A propos des bactéries Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus

Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus sont des bactéries symbiotes de nématodes entomopathogènes. Les génomes de ces bactéries sont très riches en clusters de gènes de biosynthèse (CGB), ce qui signifie qu’elles sont capables de produire une très grande diversité de petites molécules bioactives, appelées métabolites spécialisés. Ces petites molécules permettent aux bactéries d’interagir avec leurs hôtes, les membres du microbiote des nématodes, et leurs concurrents microbiens. L’étude de cette diversité chimique et de son rôle dans les interactions des micro-organismes entre eux et avec leur environnement s’appelle l’écologie chimique. Les activités biologiques spécifiques de ces molécules peuvent être détournées pour des usages en santé humaine, animale et végétale. Si beaucoup de CGB de Photorhabdus et Xenorhabdus sont connus, les structures chimiques des molécules qui leurs sont associées, ainsi que leurs activités biologiques, restent en grande partie à découvrir.

ByPar Agnes Stephens 15/03/2022 Categories: Les catégories: News

 

Contact UsContactez nous
Close

Phone
+33 (0) 411 716 185

Nosopharm Headquarters
Danica B
21 avenue Georges Pompidou
69486 Lyon cedex 03
France


Nosopharm Labs

Espace Innovation 2
110 allée Charles Babbage
Parc Scientifique G. Besse
30000 Nîmes
France

Tél
+33 (0) 411 716 185

Siège social
Danica B
21 avenue Georges Pompidou
69486 Lyon cedex 03
France

Nosopharm Labs

Espace Innovation 2
110 allée Charles Babbage
Parc Scientifique G. Besse
30000 Nîmes
France